Happy Scarves

flat rib scarf

These are flat rib scarves knit in bright “happy” colors. The flat rib can be knit on any knitting machine with a ribber (double bed).  Set your machine up for full needle rib (all needles in work on main bed and rib bed).  Needles are alternating–not directly across from each other.  Knit your cast on (zig zag, hang comb, knit circular rows).  After the cast on is complete, you will transfer some ribber stitches to the main bed and put those ribber needles out of work.  All main bed needles remain in work.  On these scarves I had 4 needles out of work (or was it 5?) on the ribber and then one needle in work.  Repeat this pattern across the entire ribber bed.  I had 2 ribber needles in work on the edges of the bed.  Once you have this set up, knit across slowly with the carriage/lock or knit across by hand. Knit across by hand by doing a “free pass of the carriage/lock, then knit the yarn into the latches and knit off– by hand.  This row will be hard to knit because of the doubled up stitches.  Knit scarf to length desired and bind off.  This pattern knits lays flat (edges do not roll).  It is a great pattern for using up stash and “gifting.”

Remember when knitting in full needle rib, you will need to use lighter weight yarns than what you would use for single bed or 1×1/2×2 rib etc.

The scarves photographed were knit on a 9mm bulky machine in worsted weight yarn.

Farm Fresh Yarns

posted in: Online Shop, yarn 0

I sent Cormo and Wensleydale fleeces to the mill to be spun into yarn.  The yarn is now here and it is listed in the shop.  The Cormo yarn is 2 ply worsted weight with yardage per skein approximately 150 Yards +/-.  Cormo is a fine wool and is next-to-skin soft. This is a naturally bright white wool.  The Wensleydale yarn is single ply Lopi style spun yarn in bulky weight.
Skeins are approximately 90 Yards +/- and they are big 5 ounce skeins +/-.  Both wools take dye very well. 

Cormo 2 ply shown with penny for size comparision
Wensleydale single ply yarn shown with penny for size comparison.

I am attaching a video (below) featuring Mati Ventrillon of Fair Isle, Scotland.  It shows how she makes her highly sought-after Fair Isle sweaters according to traditions that are centuries old...

The Making of a Fair Isle Sweater…

Winter Update

posted in: farm, Uncategorized 0

With the New Year just a couple of days away, I figured it was time for a blog update.  We have added a flock of fine wool Shetland sheep (several ewes in many colors and a couple of rams) to the farm and will have breeding stock and fleece available.

shetland sheep

I am posting a great video by British Wool to share.  Hope you have a great New Year!

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