Handwoven Saori Style

Saori weaving is a type of free form weaving.  I use a lot of my art yarns/chunky yarns in Saori style weaving.  The first step of the process starts with washing and dyeing the fleece.  After the wool has dried, it is carded into a batt.

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The batt is spun into yarn.

handspun

 

I select warp threads and wind the warp.

warp test

wind warp

The loom is dressed.

saori

The cloth is woven.

handwoven

The cloth is cut from the loom, washed, and fringe is tied.

A Saori scarf!

saori scarf

saori weaving

 

The Hay is in…

The first cutting of hay is baled and stacked in the barn.  We got it cut and baled just before the rains.  There are a few wagon loads and lots of round bales.hay

hay

sheep at waterer

Got some spinning done…

handspunI take lots of photos (not just of sheep and fiber).  We were exploring on our old property down the way and I got some great photos of this old truck.  Some nice colors for dyeing.  As you can see from the photos, the rain was coming…and it hasn’t left since.

old truck

truckfender

 

Spinning up Some Batts!

 

Carded Cormo Batts
Carded Cormo Batts

I have been busy spinning some super-soft Cormo batts.  The fleece is washed (to remove all lanolin!), hand-dyed, and then carded.  The batts are about 90% Cormo with 10% Wensleydale, other wools, silk, Angelina.  I have listed some in my shop.  These batts are next-to-skin soft!!  I love them!

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The photo above is my spinning progress so far.  I have 2 batts (about 8 ounces) in this colorway.  I plan on knitting a Venetian Blind shawl with the yarn. If you are a member of Ravelry here is a link to the pattern http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/venetian-blind .  I am not sure if the link will work for a non-member. Ravelry membership is free.  It is a great resource for everything fiber (knit, crochet, spin, weave).

I am spinning on my Mach III wheel by Spinolution. The bobbin is the 8 ounce bobbin. They also have a 32 ounce bobbin and yes, they are huge!  I love my Mach III.  I have had it for several years.  It is the perfect wheel for spinning Aran and heavier yarns.

New Spins!

I have some new handspun to share!  Fibers include super soft Cormo and Wensleydale from my sheep, along with various other wools, silk, and Angelina.

Melon handspun 108.5 yards chunky weight singles yarn.

I got some before and after spun photos of my next one.  This one (below) is Tyblue.  I spun it from a batt my son carded for me.  The yarn is heavy worsted singles 245 yards.

My New Spinolution Mach III

posted in: Spinning | 0
Mach III

My new wheel arrived a few days ago.  I was trying to decide between a Spinolution or a beautiful Schacht Saxony.  Both wheels are entirely different (and are for different types of yarns!).  It was a hard decision.  I ended up choosing the Spinolution Mach III and couldn’t be happier!

I ordered the 8oz set up and the oversize bobbin set up for my wheel, along with the wheels and lazy kate.  I think the only other thing I need to order is the tube orifice.  I would have ordered it with the wheel, but I did not know anything about it until a day or so ago.

Mach III with oversized bobbin/flyer and kate

Here are a few photos of my first skein spun on my wheel.  The fibers in the yarn are Cormo and Wensleydale from my sheep along with some silk and Angelina.

Handspun on Mach III

Art Roving Hackle from Blue Mountain Handcrafts

Art Roving Hackle

It’s HERE!  My much anticipated Art Roving Hackle from Blue Mountain Handcrafts is here.  I have been wanting one of these hackles for quite some time now.  It is a breeze to use.  I have been having lots of fun combining fleeces and fibers and coming up with some awesome rovings.

Roving

The above roving is a blend of Cormo, Coopworth Lamb, Wensleydale lamb, Silk, bamboo rayon, and Angelina.

There was very little waste after I dized off the roving.

The diz I used is one I recently purchased from Seven Yaks on Etsy.  It has several diz hole sizes to choose from.

Handspun Singles

Look for some Cormo blended rovings in my Etsy and online farm shop soon!

Two-ply or not Two-ply

posted in: Handspun Yarn, Knit, Spinning, Weaving | 1

Ok, so there is a bit of play on words for the title of this post, but honestly I wonder sometimes.  I love to spin singles.  LOOK at all the yardage you get from singles.  Other times, I think, “Well, the yarn may be more interesting if it is plied…”  The majority of the time I try to decide what the end us of the yarn will be.  If it is going to be for weaving and used as weft yarn, I will keep the singles.  If I am going to be knitting it, I will ply it.

I knit a lot of winter accessories.  I like to use bulky yarn to knit quickly.  Bulky yarn also makes a thick wooly winter item.  I am outside 365 days a year in all weather tending to the animals and I don’t like to be cold!  Thank God for Charhart Coveralls.  They are my winter weather favorite.  Ok, enough talk about winter.  It is in the 80’s and super nice outside!  🙂

I spun up one of my textured farm wool batts.  The fiber in the batt was Cormo, Shetalnd lamb, Wensleydale locks, mulberry silk, and a smidge of Angelina.  Here is a photo of my textured singles.

Textured Single
Textured Single

The singles looked great, but I decided they would knit up as a nice foofy hat.  The singles were Navajo plied.  This yarn will knit into a quick winter hat!  Oh, and I guess this ply is exempt from the title of the post.  Navajo ply is a 3 ply!

Navajo Ply Handspun
Finished Yarn

Sidekick Tune Up!

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Sidekick (left) and Matchless (right)

My long awaited Schacht Sidekick I ordered from Spin to Yarn has arrived!  I didn’t waste any time putting her together.  Assembly didn’t amount to much.  The wheel arrived fully assembled.  I just had to figure out how to unfold it!  After she was unfolded, I read through the instruction manual one last time to be sure I had everything correct.  The manual specified oiling points, so I gave her a good drink of oil.

When I sat down to take her for a spin, I noticed she was a bit stiff.  I had read on the Schacht Ravelry forum to oil the treadle joints, so I added a few drips of oil there.  I didn’t see any improvement in treadling.  I figured the driveband was a bit tight and maybe it would break in after some spinning.

After a day or so of spinning the wheel didn’t loosen up too much.  I looked the wheel over wondering if I had missed something.  There is a rear maiden bearing and a front maiden bearing.

Rear Maiden Bearing

I had oiled both bearings (or so I thought), but decided to oil again.  After looking at the rear bearing closely, I realized I had oiled the inner white part of the bearing, but not the actual bearing line where the two black pieces of the bearing connect.  My dealer had explained to oil the bearing, but it was not until I looked at it very closely that I realized I had not been oiling the correct part of the bearing.

Rear Maiden Bearing

The bearing is made up of two black rings.  The dividing line between the two black rings is where the oil needs to be placed.  I ran the tip of my oil bottle around the line and added a good dose of oil.  As I started to spin, the difference was tremendous!  I spun for a bit and added some more oil.  It loosened up even more!!

It is amazing that just a little oil in the correct spot can make an immense difference in how a wheel spins!  I am always sure to oil all of my wheels after a couple of hours of spinning to keep them spinning well.  And remember even a new wheel needs a good oiling!

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