Just Keep Threading…

posted in: Weaving | 0
Threading is DONE!

After many distractions, I finally got my heddles threaded.  I hope to have the reed sleyed and the warped tied on by this weekend.

I have already been lining up my next project.  I am planning a long warp for towels which will be given away as gifts for Christmas.

Sunday Driver

posted in: Equine | 0
Driving...

Everyone hates being stuck behind a Sunday driver, but it isn’t all that bad if you are the one driving!  🙂  The weather has been really nice lately.  This is the best time of the year for trail riding and driving.

World Equestrian Games

posted in: Equine | 0

The World Equestrian GamesWorld Equestrian Games

World Equestrian Games Lexington, KY 2010

I spent 5 days in Lexington, Ky to attend the World Equestrian Games.  I had tickets for the driving series.  The driving consists of 3 parts: dressage, marathon, and cones.

The first part of the driving series was the dressage driving.  The dressage took place over two days. The judges look for a good turnout (how good everything looks) and how well the dressage test is driven.

World Equestrian Games
Chester Weber

The marathon driving was day three of the driving series.  The marathon tests the stamina and fitness of the horse   The marathon usually consists of 3 to 5 sections.  The section E is the hazard/obstacle section.  The hazard section of the marathon draws the biggest crowds.

I was lucky to find a spot in the front row at the Head of the Lake hazard.  Marathon hazards include water, tight turns around trees or man-made obstacles, hills, or fences and pens. Drivers are scored on how quickly they can negotiate through the hazard.  They also must find the fastest way throught the hazard.  Points are deducts for too much time spent in a hazard.

World Equestrian GamesWorld Equestrian Games
Marathon Driving

The last phase of the driving is the cones.  The cones is an timed obstacle course.  The course must be driven with the red cone on the right and the white cone on the left.  The cones are just a few centimeters wider than the wheels of the cart.  Each cone has a ball balancing on the top.  Points are deducted for knocking the ball off the cone.

World Equestrian Games
Cones Course
World Equestrian Games
Cones Course

The scores from all 3 parts of the driving series are combined to give a final result. In all three parts, scores and times are converted into “penalty points”, which are then added together. The competitor with the lowest penalty score is the winner.

For more information about the World Equestrian Games, visit www.alltechfeigames.com and www.usef.org

Here is a video of Chester Weber on the cones course.

Dyeing Bamboo

posted in: Dyeing | 0

I have been dyeing quite a bit of bamboo lately using Procion MX fiber reactive dyes.  These dyes are used for plant fibers like bamboo/rayon and cotton.  Since the fiber reactive dyes are a little more labor intensive than the acid dyes, I usually dye a lot of fiber at once.  The dyeing is quite easy, but the rinsing can be a chore.  Once I have dyed a batch of fiber with reactive dyes, I am happy to go back to dyeing with acid dyes for awhile!

Bamboo is one of my favorite fibers to use as an add-in for carded batts.  The fiber is soft and silky.  It adds shine and soft texture.  I will be adding some to the shop soon!

Super Simple Rigid Heddle Scarf

posted in: Weaving | 3

I finished weaving a super quick scarf on my Flip rigid heddle.  The weather has turned a bit chilly and I decided to take a break from threading my floor loom to weave a scarf.

From start (threading) to finish (tying the fringe), this scarf took about 2 hours to weave. I used Classic Yarns Cashsoft Chunky for the warp in 3 colors of purple (three 50gram balls, one in each color).  The yarn was about 9 wraps per inch which made the sett at about 5.  I used my new 5 dent Flip heddle which I recenlty purchased from Patty Anne’s Place.

I wanted my scarf to be 70″ long so I could fold it in half and pull the ends through to make it super warm, and keep it from falling off!  I also wanted the scarf to be 6″ wide.

Here are my calculations:

9 wraps per inch divided by 2 = 4.5  (I rounded this up to 5 for a sett of 5 and used a 5 dent reed/heddle)

70″ length + 10% take up= 76

76 + loom waste of 24″ on a rigid heddle (add more if you are using a floor loom)

70+6=76  +10%= 83.6 +24 = 107.6

107.6 is the total length of each warp thread.  Notice I did not add any length in my calculations for sampling.  You can add to the length if you want to do some sampling.

Ok, next calculation:  How many warp ends?

The woven width + take up x sett= how many ends I will need.

6″ + .6 (the 10% take up) x 5 =33

I need 33 warp ends.

How much warp yarn do I need?

Total length x # of ends

70×33=2310  divide 2310 by 36 to get yardage

2310 divided by 36 =64.16  or approximately 65 yards

I did not calculate yardage for my weft.  I used various handspun yarns.

The photo above is what my warp looked like.  I used 3 colors of Cashsoft.

The scarf moved along quickly.  It seemed as if it was done in no time.  The handspun yarns I used for the weft were mostly worsted or chunky yarns.

When I reached the end of my weaving, I cut the warp threads, removed the scarf from the loom, and tied my fringe.  I tied over hand knots for the fringe.  A trick I have found useful for getting the knots tight is to use a tapestry needle in the knot.  I tie an overhand knot and insert a tapestry needle in the knot loop.  I hold the needle up above the fell of the woven cloth as I am pulling the knot tight.  After the knot is tight I remove the needle and tighten the knot a bit more.  I find this makes a neater knot!

Rigid Heddle Scarf

Art Yarn

posted in: Spinning | 0
Still Spinning....

I have been working on spinning some yarn for weaving weft.  The latest handspun is a blend of CVM, Wensleydale locks, merino, mulberry silk, and bamboo.

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